Author
 
 
Reviews
 
 
What the experts say
 

Other books in the TINY series
Tiny Essentials of Fundraising
Tiny Essentials of
Major Gift Fundraising

Tiny Essentials of
an Effective Volunteer Board

Tiny Essentials of
Raising Money from
Foundations and Trusts

Tiny Essentials of
Monthly Committed Giving

Tiny Essentials of
a Fundraising Strategy

Tiny Essentials of
Donor Loyalty


 

WLP contents

 
Web links  
 

Credit card order form

 
 

Tiny Essentials of Writing for Fundraising

George Smith. The White Lion Press Limited.
Published 2003. £9.95+postage and packing
(for discounts on bulk orders please see order form).
Softback, 65 pages. ISBN 0-9518971-6-0


Small, but packed with the power of fine words.

In this second title in the Tiny series, the author says, ‘We live in a world where words are increasingly without meaning. Where clichés rule. Where the power of words to explain, to communicate and to convince is currently in abeyance.’

But you and I know that words really do matter. If the business of raising money for charity is all about inspiring potential donors to believe in a cause then it follows that, more than most professionals, fundraisers should appreciate the power and potential of fine words.

Yet despite their industry’s obvious scope for fine writing, fundraisers are rather poor at it, as can be seen from even a casual look at the missives from charities that stack our mailboxes.

Well, now there’s a ‘how to’ book designed to help fundraisers to communicate much more effectively. At one point George Smith offers the observation opposite.

One’s heart indeed soars at the very prospect. But as Smith and the rest of us are well aware, while fundraising appeals abound such inviting letters from fundraisers are all too rare. The purpose of this tiny book, then, is to change all that.

Tiny Essentials of Writing for Fundraising tells you what you need to know to write more clearly, more convincingly and more accessibly. And, like all books in the Tiny Essentials series it does so with clarity and precision.

See also Asking Properly and Up Smith Creek.

 

 

‘I suggest your heart would soar if – once
in a while – you received a letter written in
decent English which said unexpected things
in elegant ways, which moved you and
stirred your emotions, which angered you
or made you proud, a letter which you
wanted to read from beginning to end,
a letter apparently written by one
individual to another individual. For you
never see these letters any more...’